Paddy Casey - New double album in the pipeline

By Aideen O'Flaherty 

PADDY Casey first set the Irish music scene alight in 1999 with the release of his hugely successful debut album Amen (So Be It), which was certified triple platinum in Ireland.

After several years of touring, the Crumlin man then released his second album Living in 2003, which featured the breakthrough hit ‘Saints and Sinners’ which is famed for its infectiously anthemic quality.

Paddy Casey contrast AMA

The seasoned musician, who left school at 13-years-old and started busking in Dublin and Galway in order to pursue his dream of being a musician, has an impressive back catalogue and has a double album and an acoustic album in the pipeline.

Paddy told The Echo about his most memorable gig, his frustration with Facebook, and writing a funeral song for himself.

Do you remember what the first song you wrote was like?

Yes, I do. ‘Sweet Suburban Sky’, I wrote it as a poem and I had a bit of music, and the words sat easily on the music. I smoked a cigarette for the craic; I said that I was going to smoke a cigarette and then write a song. I used to write stuff when I was a kid, I had a little Walkman and I’d record on a four-track.

What’s your favourite song to perform live?

I always like the new songs. I have one I wrote a few weeks ago that I enjoy playing live, it’s called ‘What I Can’t Have’. It’s upbeat and if I can persuade the crowd to get into it then it’s great fun. I’ve been doing lots of acoustic shows lately, but I do play the odd big gig. I enjoy the freedom of playing acoustic shows, because you can change a song in the middle, it’s less structured.

You’ve previously recorded with the Shannon Gospel Choir and the Dublin Gospel Choir. What do you enjoy most about have a choir featured as part of your songs?

I love the sound of a choir. I love classical music and I always enjoy putting strings on my songs. I like having more voices, even if it’s a drunk choir!

You regularly engage with your fans through your Facebook page. What difference do you think social media has had on your work as a musician?

I kind of hate Facebook, I hate how much time you can waste on it. I don’t think I’m very good at it, and I don’t like certain ways people use it. I think about the intent behind it…and the amount of bands that record labels wouldn’t have bothered their ar**s to sign if they didn’t have a big following on social media.

What’s the most memorable interaction that you’ve had with a fan?

I meet everyone after a gig. I’ve played at funerals and stuff, I’ve had a lot of people come up to me and tell me about how my songs helped them when someone passed away. I find it awkward and touching at the same time. I’ve actually written a funeral song for myself, it’s called ‘Lay No Stone Upon My Grave’. I don’t think of death as a sad thing, even though people can die in sad ways.

What’s been your favourite gig to play so far?

One of my first big gigs, at Oxegen. It was in a big tent and it was packed. Everyone knew the words and it was the first time that had happened to me. I was blown away, and so that gig has stayed with me.

Do you have any plans to release a new album?

I’ve got a double album and an acoustic album, and I’ve just finished mixing the acoustic album. The double album will be one side rock and one side electro, with synths and stuff. Certain songs felt good together. I haven’t decided on album titles yet, I usually pick out a lyric that I really like from one of the songs on the album and use that.

You can keep up-to-date with Paddy Casey’s tour dates and music by following @PaddyCaseyOfficial on Facebook, or by visiting his website at www.paddycasey.ie

Prev Rewind - Glencree German War Cemetery
Next Civic Summer Season - Theatre launch their exciting listings

echo YT channel